No Picture
General Article

Fitness and Training Programs For Distinct Weather Elements

Fitness and Training Programs For Distinct Weather Elements

The weather cycle is not to be taken forgranted during a body building program. Rather it should be factored in the program in a way that enhances the gains accrued from such a program.

Weather elements like temperature, rain, humidity and the like are key factors which determine the success of a body building program. If for example you have planned for a jog in the nearby park and the day becomes very chilly or ice layers cover the ground to the brim, you can not continue as planned. It would be foolhardy to go running in the rain all in the name of maintaining a workout schedule. Resultant health concerns and or consequences of such an action would prove more costly than beneficial in the long run.

It’s of no use to keep an appointment written in a body building schedule for one day only to spend the following two weeks in bed with flu. The same is true about sunny days. There are those days when the temperatures are too hot to workout effectively. Extremely high temperatures make the body sweat a lot and even dehydrate if the body builder insists on doing set upon set of demanding exercises without adequately replenishing the lost body water content.

As such high temperatures will require a body builder to adjust the workout program to ensure that exercises are done under a shade, with adequate water supply. The clothes worn during a workout in a hot day will also differ with those worn on a chilly day. If exercises are done indoors, weather elements might not be very relevant except when they go to the extreme. But if the exercises are usually done outdoors, the training program will usually suffer interruptions from the elements and this might actually hinder the gains accrued from such a program.

In another level, the body reacts differently to the weather conditions within the immediate environment. At times, like when it is cold, the body feels very comfortable while undertaking intensive workouts because essentially, that is what it would rather be doing to keep warm. But the opposite happens on hot days. Research has established that, most people miss out on exercises or absentee themselves from the gym during hot afternoon sessions. Body builders should therefore learn about this fact, and allow the body to assume less intensive exercises while the body feels more bored and lazy.

How are all these variations important to a body builder? Their relevance comes in fixing up a training schedule and set up of a routine rota. Exercises can be altered to factor in weather elements and readjusted back to normal once severe weather days have passed. The workout sessions can also be alternated in time of day to ensure that the efficiency of the workout is not compromised. Instead of waiting to go to the gym in very hot temperatures, the body builder can opt to go to the gym the first thing in the morning, when the temperatures are low and cordial.

The idea is to work with not against the weather. Alter the training program to feature distinct weather elements that might compromise the efficiency of the workout.…

No Picture
General Article

Effective Recovery for Cycling

Effective Recovery for Cycling

If you’ve just begun cycling and by chance discovered this passion, you will be lured to ride your bike at every given opportunity. It is easy to believe that a lot more you ride, the faster and stronger you will get but this is usually a common mistake that ignores the most important aspects of any training schedule, “effective recovery”. It really is in resting and effective recovery, and also the correct nutritional support, your progress is made.

Finishing a long ride routine does not mean to sit back and do little or nothing for the rest of the time. This training is not completely over until you have satisfied your body’s needs in replacing and replenishing its depleted supplies. It is necessary to take carbohydrates and proteins for effective recovery and to enhance the potency of your training. Performing this task should happen within half an hour of finishing your ride.

Why carbohydrates? Carbohydrates are the ones the replenish glycogen in our body. It merely is not enough for our bodies to possess easy sugars available at all times for our energy consumption. This would need us to consume food continuously. This is why we’ve glycogen. Glycogen will be the storage form of those easy sugars. It can be broken down anytime when we require energy. When experiencing glycogen debt, athletes often experience extreme fatigue to the point that it is difficult to move.

Why Protein? Protein is discovered in muscles, bone, hemoglobin, myoglobin, hormones, antibodies, and enzymes, and makes up about 45% from the human body. Muscle is approximately 70% water and only about 20% protein. Consequently, increasing muscle mass demands additional water, additional power within the type of carbohydrates and a little additional protein. To maintain the needs of that additional muscle, supplements of carbohydrates and protein is needed.

To fully feel the effect of a cycling workout and to feel the change in mass on your body you need to do an extensive workout. It is the place you carry on and push your entire body without letting it to properly recover. Extensive workout means that you wear down your muscle mass and organs with strenuous work. But for the change to take in effect resting is necessary and to rebuild your entire body; replacing its depleted supplies nutritionally is critical.

The effect of an extensive cycling workout generally starts with holistic soreness in the muscles along with a constant sense of tiredness. You can feel plenty of soreness and fatigue, if a training schedule is well balanced you’ll want to be able to recover enough between rides so that your performance can improve a bit more every time. Should you still feel sore from the last ride? You might like to investigate decreasing the intensity, duration, or frequency of the rides.

For anyone who is training effectively and wants to view a steady development of your strength and endurance, to get this done, effective recovery is essential. Rest and nutritional support is needed following a strenuous exercise between training sessions. Recording each session will allow you to understand what effective recovery practices you’ll do.…

No Picture
General Article

Bodybuilding Diet Options

Bodybuilding Diet Options

Diet is an important part of any bodybuilding or exercise program. You need the proper nutritional balance in your diet in order to have enough energy to successfully use any bodybuilding program. You also need the right amounts of protein, carbohydrates and fat in order to give your body the definition that you desire. A well-balanced diet that incorporates lean meat, fruits, nuts, vegetables and whole grains is ideal.

Carbohydrates are important because they will allow you to have the energy you need in order to complete the exercises that are necessary in order to sculpt the muscles you are targeting. If you do not have enough healthy carbohydrates – not just the empty calories that you find in sugars, but the carbohydrates that you find in whole grain breads, whole-grain cereals, and fresh fruit – your body will not be able to perform at the optimal level. It will be difficult, if not impossible for you to exercise on a regular basis without eating a proper diet.

You also need to make sure that you are eating at regular intervals during the day so that your blood sugar levels do not drop lower than they should. A drop in your blood sugar level will cause you to be sluggish and will also cause you to eat more than you should because your body will begin to crave foods that will help raise the blood sugar that you have.

The 1 Hour Muscles program comes with a product called “A-Z of Diets” and this gives you plenty of options when it comes to trying different diets. Read the various diets which are listed in A-Z of Diets and you should be able to find the right one which fits with your lifestyle along with your loves and hates when it comes to foods. Diets are not all about eating just salads. There are many options included in A-Z of Diets which will give you a whole host of ideas about how to eat more healthy to allow your body to take on the correct food types and nutrients it will require for the pressures places upon it during your exercise routine.

It is not only what you eat either. Some diets have different options as to how many times you eat throughout a day. There will be different quantities specified for different food types depending on which diet you choose. Some diets will be much more suitable to some people who have specific dietary needs or foods which have to be avoided for such reasons as allergies. There is no reason why you should stick rigidly to any of the diets as you may find it useful to combine more than one diet into a diet which is much more suited to your own requirements. Play around with your diet until you find the perfect balance.…

No Picture
General Article

A Road Racing Primer for Cyclists

A Road Racing Primer for Cyclists

Bike racing has exploded in the United States. In 2010, USA Cycling, the official governing body for all disciplines of competitive cycling in the United States, issued 69,771 licenses. This represents eight consecutive years in which the number of licensed, competitive cyclists rose compared with the previous year. USA Cycling also sanctioned 2,933 events across five disciplines (road, track, mountain, cyclocross and BMX) in 2010 alone.

As the name implies, road racing takes place on paved roadways. It is generally considered the most traditional and popular form of bike racing and it takes many forms. Specifically, road racing can be divided into two categories: mass start races and time trials. Mass start races include road races, criteriums, and stage races while time trials include both individual and team competitions.

1. The Individual Time Trial (ITT). A time trial is an individual race against the clock. Riders start one at a time, usually at 1-2 minute intervals. It is known as the race of truth because every rider’s performance is based entirely on his or her ability. There is absolutely no drafting or team tactics. Whoever navigates the course in the shortest amount of time is the winner. Most time trials are between 16 km (10 miles) and 40 km (24.8 miles) in length, and are contested over a variety of terrain. Because of its ease of entry and relative safety, time trialing is a great place to start as a competitive cyclist.

2. The Team Time Trial (TTT). The TTT is very similar to the individual time trial. The primary difference is that the TTT involves two or more cyclists working together to cover the route as quickly as possible. The members of the team take turns pulling at the front and providing a draft for their teammates, however, there is no drafting off of other teams. To avoid this potential problem, teams are usually released at 3-4 minute intervals.

3. The Road Race. Road races are team-oriented, mass start events held on public roads that consist of either an out-and-back route (start and finish is the same location) or point-to-point configuration (start and finish separated by the distance of the race). Some road races are held on a circuit. These are loops of more than 1 mile but generally less than 5 miles within a particular town. Race distance is typically based on rider experience (i.e., the more experience the longer the race).

4. The Criterium. Criterium racing is a purely American endeavor and is one of the most popular forms of road racing in the U.S. Criteriums (also known as “crits”) are held on relatively short (less than one mile), closed courses and are typically 1 hour or less in duration. Criteriums tend to be extremely fast races, held on relatively flat terrain that benefits the pure sprinter. Because of the frequent turns and high speeds, bike handling ability is vitally important during a criterium.

5. The Stage Race. Stage races take place over several days and often include a combination of a road race, a criterium and a time trial. The winner is the person that accrues the lowest cumulative time over the various stages. Stages races can be as short as two days or as long as three weeks (e.g., the Grand Tours which include the Tour de France, the Tour of Italy and the Tour of Spain).…

No Picture
General Article

Ten Good Reasons to Get on Your Bike This Summer

Ten Good Reasons to Get on Your Bike This Summer

We all know cycling is good for us but that still doesn’t give us anywhere near enough of an incentive to go out, identify and buy the bicycle that would be best suited to our travelling, fun, fitness and transport needs.

Here are ten top reasons to encourage you to get on your bike this Summer.

1. Transport bosses have recommended raising the cost of parking on city centre streets by up to a third. The decision to increase the cost of parking in city centre streets will be taken on 3rd June 2010 and affects a lot of cities in which we work, live and play. Are we to see another 40% hike in parking fees?

2. The average price for an adult bicycle in the UK in 2001 was A�107 (Source: Mintel, Bicycles 2001).It’s likely to be much lower now, perhaps as low as A�80.

3. There’s the fitness angle. Did you know a 130-pound woman burns about 715 calories riding 17 miles in one hour. If she slows down to 13 mph, she burns only 468 calories per hour. If she goes mountain biking, which burns about 3.9 calories per pound per hour, she burns about 507 calories. Working on a 30 minute cycle to and from work each day, she’ll be quite trim!

4. It seems our Government is keen to get us all on our bikes with the increase in funding for cycling initiatives and the expansion of the Cycling Towns Programme where over 2.5 million adults and children will benefit from levels of investment equivalent to the best European cycling cities.

5. Cycling is addictive! Like other regular exercise cycling stimulates the pleasure centres of your brain so, the more you cycle, the happier you should be.

6. You can join the ‘Cycle to Work’ scheme and get your new bike for 50% less than the retail price or simply order one online.

7. The London Cycle Hire Scheme goes live this July in time for Summer excursions in the mother city – great for a family day out.

8. British Cycling wants to get 125 000 more people cycling once a week and 1 million more people cycling once a month by 2013. To do this they are working with Sport England and Sky which means more initiatives and more cycling offers.

9. Bicycles are green. If you cycle instead of driving you’re helping save the planet or, at the very least, your immediate environment.

10.There’s a bicycle for everyone including people with hip pain! From folding, mountain and racing to children’s, tandems and electric. Bicycles are now available in just about every size, colour and for every type of body. Cycling is great for all the family and encourages family togetherness, fitness and fun.

There are a lot more points we can add to this list but you know most of the reasons why bicycling is good for you. Cycling is gaining in popularity in the UK month on month so why wait?

Go on, get on ‘yer’ bike!…

No Picture
General Article

A Brief Guide to Using Bike Lights

A Brief Guide to Using Bike Lights

Which Bike Lights to Use

The bike lights that you use should suit the type of cycling in which you partake. Those cycling on public roads, particularly in built up, street lit city settings should only require a set of standard LED lights, including a white front light and a red rear light. When cycling in urban areas the main function of your light is to make you more visible to motorists. They should therefore emit at least 4 candelas, the legal requirements for cycling on public roads, and should feature flash settings. For unlit lanes and mountain biking, much brighter lights are required. A high quality LED torch light is ideal for the front of your bike, and it is important to make sure you also have a strong rear light. At the higher end of the market these tend to need to be purchased separately.

How to Use

Most bike lights come with fittings to mount the light to the frame of your bike, meaning that they can be easily removed when they are not in use. Cyclists tend to fit their front light to the handlebars of the bike, and the rear light to the seat post (the pole below the saddle) or just below. This will however vary depending on both light and frame. The law states that when cycling on public roads a front light must be positioned up to 150cm from the ground, while rear lights must be between 35cm and 150cm from the ground. Be sure to keep your lighting clean at all times, and be careful that your rear light is not likely to be obstructed by bags and/or coats. For mountain bikers and off road cyclists the rules regarding positioning relax, and there is much more freedom for the cyclist to choose where and how their lights are positioned.

When to Use Your Bike Lights

The law requires cyclists on public roads to use bike lights between sunset and sunrise, however there are other occasions when you may need to use them. Poor weather considerably reduces visibility, and in such conditions it is wise to use your lights to ensure motorists can still see you clearly. Conditions such as heavy rain, mist, fog and sleet/snow all fall into this category. On a daily basis it is also wise to turn them on as soon as the light begins to fade. As with the positioning of your light the rules surrounding when to use them relax when cycling off public roads, however it is still advisable to use your bike lights in all of the above conditions.…

No Picture
General Article

In-Building Wireless Considerations

The benefits of in-building wireless are numerous. However, there are some key considerations to consider when implementing this technology. First, mobile operators must be involved and approved before implementation. They’ve invested billions of dollars in building their networks and want to provide their customers with the best mobile experience. To avoid legal issues, in-building wireless systems must be licensed and able to access the appropriate frequencies. These considerations are outlined below.

Distributed antenna system (DAS)

Choosing a DAS for your in-building wireless coverage depends on the size of your building and the location you want to cover. For example, a large stadium, concert hall, or sports arena may have high levels of cellular data usage. If your DAS cannot handle the additional demand, nearby cell towers may be overwhelmed, causing your local network to become unstable. In such cases, you need a high-capacity DAS.

A distributed antenna system (DAS) combines multiple antenna elements to distribute power efficiently. This helps deliver coverage similar to a single antenna while reducing the total power consumption and improving reliability. Several small antennas replace a large antenna, requiring high power to operate. The DAS is used by several service providers across the United States and has been proven effective in situations where zoning and terrain obstacles are a problem.

Microcell system

A Microcell in-building wireless system provides a high-performance indoor coverage area within a building. A microcell system includes a central omnidirectional antenna and a distributed antenna system. The latter comprises four directional antennas covering a section of the building, forming a ring that extends to the corners of the building. Each directional antenna covers a particular building portion, and all are connected to a single base station. Because the antennas in these building blocks are identical, the frequencies and channels are the same. Because this is the case, a portable device does not need to change channels to receive a signal.

A microcell can automatically transfer users from one access point to another to provide better network reliability and eliminate the need for a separate cell tower. Before installing a Microcell in-building wireless system, locate it in a building with enough backhaul. This backhaul is typically in the form of fiber optic cables installed in the ground. If a facility has existing conduits, these cables can be routed to the Microcell.

Distributed cellular system

In-building wireless coverage is one of the primary considerations for any building. The best solution for an in-building wireless range blends well with the outdoor macro network. The in-building wireless network uses a distributed cellular system, ensuring complete coverage in a particular service area and a smooth handover from a building to the macrocell. Distributed cellular systems also allow carriers to allocate radio resources specifically to the building. The results are full coverage in buildings, giving carrier marketing teams the ability to present corporate promotions and give landlords an edge over the competition.

The in-building cellular enhancement system connects to a carrier signal source, usually a bi-directional amplifier or base transceiver station. The signal is carried using coaxial or optical fiber and boosted through the building by in-building coverage antennas. Small cells and repeaters increase coverage in areas where macrocells are not installed.

Distributed antenna system (BDA)

A distributed antenna system can improve overall coverage and capacity while using less power than single antennas. It can also overcome feeder losses, reduce fading depths, and delay spread. Several service providers have used the distributed antenna system to meet their building codes. This system is handy in scenarios where zoning restrictions or terrain obstacles are a problem. It also offers the added benefit of being future-proof.

This system is also designed to solve the coverage issue, eliminating the need for workarounds. The indoor antenna will feed a clear signal from the outside throughout the building. In addition, because the system is flexible, it can integrate existing coverage. For example, if a building has a lone wireless provider, the system could be configured to repeat that carrier’s frequencies throughout the entire building. However, if multiple pages are present, it may be best to use a multi-carrier system.…